selling

Q. As the owner of an internet video marketing company, what is the most effective way for me to prospect and generate sales with little or no budget? Asked on LinkedIn by Jonathan Franco.

A. Selling “internet video marketing services” cries out for internet video marketing!
At the same time, 80% of selling is just showing up. You’ve got to get your face out there. In the end, people buy you.

The people I know in your business go to meetings of business organizations and make presentations on how to do video marketing affordably. The venue must have wi-fi and a digital projector, so that you can demonstrate some before-and-after efforts. Select a guinea pig and do a two-minute video for them right on the spot. You want people to say, “That’s not so scary! I could do that!” and “I like this guy. I want to hire him to help me.”
Your approach is to show ’em how to do it for themselves, so that they will hire you to do it for ’em.

No budget? Then you have a one-man bootstrap operation–at least initially. You have to substitute your time for money. But you will need to invest in a quality website, where you can embed your videos, because that’s your portfolio.

It’s hard for me to see you attracting investors so you can hire a sales force. Don’t waste your time even trying. Get out there and sell yourself!

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Marketing vs. Selling

September 24, 2009 · 4 comments

in Marketing

Q. What’s the difference between marketing and selling? I often hear these words used interchangeably.
(Asked during Business Group meeting)

A. Marketing and sales are often confused because “sales person” is seen as much less prestigious than “marketing associate,” so everything gets lumped into marketing.
Marketing is everything you do to prepare for sales. Selling is closing sales that make you money. Thus, you could say . . .
— Marketing is money OUT the door.
— Selling is money IN the door.
For small business owners, marketing is usually time intensive. We spend at least as many hours as we do dollars on marketing.
People who are good at marketing are often not good at selling and vice versa. These take different personalities and mindsets. Seldom will you find one person who is good at both. That goes for us entrepreneurs as well. We’re usually much better at one than the other, but we are forced into both roles, one of which we do poorly.

WHAT’S INCLUDED IN MARKETING? Remember, marketing is everything that leads up to selling. Here are some marketing activities:
– Handling incoming inquiries
– Asking your current customers for referrals for more business
– Networking and building relationships
– Advertising and public relations. Direct mail and e-newsletters
– Special promotional events
– Merchandising and merchandise selection
– Holding sales, offering preferred customer bonuses
– Getting articles published. Blogging
– Doing cold calls to set appointments
– Market research, customer surveys
– Branding, creating your sales message
– Design and creation of collateral materials
– Building and maintaining your web site, blog, Facebook page, Twitter
– Market planning and strategizing

Marketing includes doing good work so that your customers come back, and tell others about you. It includes hiring employees who are good at customer service, and giving them the training so that they can keep your customers happy.

Marketing includes pricing–finding the price level that will attract the customers you most want to do business with (and will make you a profit).

Marketing includes product design and development and packaging.

All these things lead up to selling.

SELLING INCLUDES THE ACTIVITIES THAT GET CUSTOMERS TO MAKE A PURCHASE . . .
. . . presenting, answering questions, making suggestions, doing proposals or estimates, addressing concerns, negotiating. And most important, asking for the sale. Then completing the sales agreement, etc.

Your sales people clearly do some marketing. Networking, responding to inquiries, making public presentations, doing cold calling, calling old customers. The marketing that sales people do best is just one or two steps away from selling.

Selling is harder than marketing, and this is why good sales people get paid a lot of money. As business owner, your aim should be that your sales people get filthy rich, because in the process, they make you even richer.

Because selling is hard for many people (including sales people), those who are hired to do both often spend too much time on marketing activities and not enough on selling. (This goes for us as business owners as well.)

Salespeople are motivated by performance incentives, aka commissions. In my experience, sales people on an hourly rate or salary are less effective. If there’s a mix between salary and commission, it should be weighted toward the latter. Their performance is very easy to measure: signed orders, cash in the door. Not hours worked, nor contacts made, but sales closed.

The marketing and selling funnel. This funnel shows the different stages of marketing as it proceeds toward a sale. It’s wide at the top and narrow at the bottom. This represents that your marketing must reach a lot of people in order to make a few sales.

I’ll send this to you for free. Just subscribe to my list, then email me and ask for it. I’ll send it as a pdf. (You’ll also receive my Success Tips from Small Business Owners, just for subscribing.)

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My Top 10 Rules for Small Business Marketing

August 14, 2008

Q: What are the marketing needs for the average small business? Do you consider working with marketing consultants and, if so, what would you go to one for? 

I’m looking to get thoughts from those who are in/ run a small business (i.e., sole-proprietorship to a place with fewer than 20 employees)  (Linked In posting, […]

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